Add Your Favorite Modern Landmarks

Fallingwater
Fallingwater's famous view

Credit: Krista Walton

What modernist landmarks did we leave out of the magazine's timeline? Which buildings from the modernist period and the recent past are among your favorites? Add yours to the list below.

1909 Robie House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Chicago. The culmination of Wright's prairie style features a striking combination of intersecting and parallel planes.

1922 Schindler House, Rudolf Schindler, Los Angeles. Schindler was one of the many European modernists who migrated to California. His house blends a minimalist interior (which would be hugely influential) with the natural world beyond.

1923 La Roche-Jeanneret House, Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret, Paris. With its geometrical combination of mass and light, the house epitomized Le Corbusier's "machine for living in" dictum and modern architects' interest in the mechanical age.

1926 Bauhaus, Walter Gropius, Dessau, Germany. This building, a concrete-and-glass expression of the Bauhaus movement, was recently restored.  

1929 Philip Lovell House, Richard Neutra, Los Angeles. Sleek and elegant, the white house, with panels of glass and concrete, is perched on a hillside, commanding a stunning view.

1936 Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright, Bear Run, Pa. This icon of concrete, steel, glass, and native stone, growing organically from the water and woodlands surrounding it, remains one of the most recognizable houses in America.

1939 Museum of Modern Art, Philip Goodwin and Edward Durell Stone, New York City. The six-story landmark was among the first significant International Style buildings erected in the United States.

1950 Glass House, Philip Johnson, New Canaan, Conn. The architect's glass-and-steel home bears the influence of Mies van der Rohe and is at once bold and serene.

1961 TWA Terminal, Eero Saarinen, New York City. The spirit of the jet age is captured in the interiors and the exterior massing of  this swooping, stylish structure.

1970 Brasilia Cathedral, Oscar Niemeyer, Brasilia, Brazil. This soaring, dramatic space stands in contrast to the federal buildings Niemeyer designed for the modernist Brazilian capital.

1983 Portland Building, Michael Graves, Portland, Ore. The Rose City's mammoth, 15-story structure was the poster child for postmodernism.

1989 Pyramid, I.M. Pei, Paris. Pei's glass pyramid in front of the Louvre, reviled by Parisians when completed, has now been embraced.

1997 Getty Center, Richard Meier, Los Angeles. Located atop a hill with views of the Pacific Ocean, the billion-dollar museum complex is a tram ride away from the freeways and congestion of L.A. 

Comments

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Submitted by Wrightgeek at: January 8, 2009
The 1947 Kaufmann Residence by Richard Neutra in Palm Spring, CA. The epitome of the southern California International Style residence. Pierre Koening's Case House Study No. 21 in Los Angeles should also be on this list, which I believe was from 1960.

Submitted by Sheryl at: September 14, 2008
The "Doo Wop" motels in Wildwood, NJ (1955-1970)

Submitted by Elrol at: July 22, 2008
Saarinen's MIT Chapel, Le Corbusier's Ronchamp chapel, Sert's Miro Foundation museum in Barcelona, Architects' Collaborative Six Moon Hill community in Lexington MA, Carl Koch's TechBuilt prefab house.

Submitted by Vicki Paris Goodman at: June 26, 2008
My favorite modernist building is the central library at the University of California at San Diego, where I attended college in the early 1970s. When I would walk as a student across the eucalyptus grove to get to the library, it would suddenly come into view in all its splendor and take my breath away. Shaped like a diamond, with the first and fifth floors being the smallest and the third floor the largest, it truly is a diamond of an architectural specimen. The building's shape, its materials of constuction (steel, concrete and glass), its once pristine setting, and its panoramic canyon views made it an icon of inspiration. As a university library, however, perhaps the building competed with a student's motivation to study - there was simply too much to enjoy about the building itself.

Submitted by KarinL at: May 23, 2008
La Maison de Verre, Pierre Chareau

Submitted by lkjh at: May 22, 2008
My house. It's a 1936 Bauhaus house in Roosevelt, NJ. The entire community is a National Historic District and a NJ State Historic District.

Submitted by VictorS at: May 20, 2008
Well one of my favorite landmarks was uncerimoniously torn down without a whimper a few years a go, RM Schindlers Wolff House on Santa Catalina Island. So I'll add another milestone: FLWs Taliesin East in Spring Green Wisconsin, I have been to many houses and many buildings in my time, but Taliesin has to be one of the single best integrated houses with its surroundings I have ever encountered, it is also one of the most peacefull interior spaces I have been in, something considering the violence in its past (2 fires and the murder). It was clear to me that later houses like Fallingwater simply would not be as successful if Wright had not continued experimenting here. So hats off to Daddy Frank!

Submitted by cathrin at: May 20, 2008
Konrad Wachsmann and his house Dr. Estrich near Berlin, Germany. It is the first house designed by Wachsmann as an architect together with his famous Albert Einstein-house near Berlin in 1929. The Dr. Estrich-house is his only brick building and is located next to the medieval city wall and tower. With the Dr. Estrich-house Wachsmann shows his talent as an elegant designer of the modernist period in pureness.

Submitted by Vix at: May 15, 2008
The central library at the University of California at San Diego, where I attended college in the early 1970's. When I would walk as a student across the eucalyptus grove to get to the library, it would suddenly come into view in all its splendor and take my breath away. Shaped like a diamond, with the first and fifth floors being the smallest and the third floor the largest, it truly is a diamond of an architectural specimen. The building's shape, its materials of constuction (steel, concrete and glass), its once pristine setting, and its panoramic canyon views made it an icon of inspiration. As a university library, however, perhaps the building competed with a student's motivation to study - there was simply too much to enjoy about the building itself.

Submitted by Babs at: May 14, 2008
The Phoenix building in Hartford, CT. Only two sided building in America.

Submitted by GCase at: May 12, 2008
Hyatt Regency Atlanta (1967, John Portman).....original atrium building. Still as stunning as ever, with it's space-age birthdate evident in the glass elevators and space-ship revolving lounge.

Submitted by hankinmarin at: May 8, 2008
the Marin County Civic Center, by FL WRIGHT odd but fabulous his only civic building (I believe)

Submitted by Environmental Design Archives at: May 6, 2008
It would be nice to include modernist gardens as well as buildings such as the Donnell Garden by Thomas Church in Sonoma. Another modernist icon would be the Weston Havens House in Berkeley CA by Harwell H. Harris

Submitted by CRIMSON MAN at: May 6, 2008
I will have to say my favorit, at least locally (Arizonna) would have to start with three fountains, some of the Units in the Embacy, and then (not local) the LV house-lets here it for prefab. I love amazing conversions and fund juxtapositions of style weather architechture or people.

Submitted by Jo at: May 5, 2008
Dorton Arena, Raleigh, North Carolina, Architect-Matthew Norwicki 1952 and North Carolina Blue Cross and Blue Shield Building in Chapel Hill, NC. Architect,Arthur Gould Odell Jr Both Award Winning Buildings

Submitted by SuzyQ at: May 2, 2008
Alden Dow's home and studio in Midland, Michigan is wonderful as is his City Hall in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Submitted by JAD at: May 2, 2008
Lou Kahn- Library,Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter,NH, 1965-1972 Lou Kahn- National Assembly Building, Dhaka, Bangladesh, 1962-1983 LeCorbusier- Chapel, Ronchamp, 1950-1955

Submitted by Lmarreiros at: May 2, 2008
The Farnsworth House im Plano, Ill. by Mies van der Rohe. Contemporary to the Glass House but in my opinion having a more striking design.

Submitted by gqgal at: May 1, 2008
Richard Neutra's 1961 Cyclorama building at Gettysburg, a symbol of a time when the National Park Service sought out the nation's best architects for park buildings. Despite its architectural and historic significance, the building will very likely be demolished within the year.

Submitted by sth at: May 1, 2008
The Portland (Maine) Public Library is a bold, granite-faced civic structure designed by Shelpley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbott of Boston, in association with Schurman Associates of Portland. It is a very late example of the International style, completed in 1979. Unlike most International style masonry buildings, which were built earlier, it is faced in granite rather than concrete. The material choice may be attributable to the fact that traditional materials such as granite, marble, and brick were returning to favor with the emergence of the Post-Modern style, which was overtaking the International style by the late 1970s. Exhibiting a direct and geometric composition, it is a distinctly modern building constructed of the highest quality materials. The Portland Public Library is reportedly the last International style public building built in America, and is Portland’s best example of the style.