Delta Queen Steamboat

Visitor Information

, Tennessee
Website: http://www.save-the-delta-queen.org

Built in 1927, the Delta Queen is America's last remaining overnight paddle-wheeled steamboat still operating on the inland waterways.  She is a designated National Historic Landmark and has a storied past, including steamer passage on the Sacramento River and service as troop barracks during World War II.  Her interior features Tiffany-style stained glass, hardwood paneling, brass fittings, and a grand staircase crowned by a crystal chandelier.  Since 1948 the Delta Queen has plied the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, with festive stops at communities along the way.  The National Trust for Historic Preservation has offered tours aboard Delta Queen for many years.

Because of her wooden superstructure, the Delta Queen has operated under a statutory exemption from the Safety of Life at Sea Act since the late 1960s, and extensive safety precautions had been implemented by her owners.  The exemption had been granted nine times previously, but it expired in November 2008, limiting the number of overnight passengers the Delta Queen can carry to 50, rather than her capacity of 176. 

On February 11th, the Delta Queen arrived in Chattanooga, Tennessee, to begin service as a floating hotel.  This is good news for the boat, keeping her maintained and open to the public, but is only a temporary solution.  The Delta Queen's significance rests on her service as an operating vessel, plying America's inland waterways as she has since 1927.  For more information, visit: www.save-the-delta-queen.org.

The legendary Delta Queen, whose distinctions include a listing on the National Register of Historic Places, is no longer taking travelers down the mighty Mississippi. From its late 19th-century steam calliope to its grand staircase, this 80 year old grande dame has delighted the generations that have graced her decks. National Trust for Historic Preservation Tours has a long history with this famous steamboat. The very first tour offered to  National  Trust members was aboard this illustrious paddlewheeler almost 40 years ago.    

We encourage you to share your memories of the Delta Queen.  Whether you joined us on a National Trust Study Tour, or planned your own trip on this majestic steamboat, we'd like to hear your stories of traveling down the mighty Mississippi.

Tell Us About Your Experiences on the Delta Queen

Comments

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Submitted by carl at: May 15, 2010
This needs to be saved it has had no problems in past!!!! We see none for the times to come. This boat means a lot to the midwest people. Everyone should see it go under a bridge on a moon lit night.

Submitted by 45Titan at: May 14, 2010
It's a shame that the government is wanting to shut this boat down. This is just one more attempt in controlling people and what we do. As far as I'm concerned a individual knows the risks of traveling by this boat but we will still do it anyways... That's our choice. This magnificent boat is a part of our culture and MUST not be put into retirement.

Submitted by tv at: May 13, 2010
I have seen the delta queen come up the mississippi river many times at winona and the la crosse lock and dam it was a very fun experience

Submitted by Ralph at: April 2, 2010
Anyone who sails on the Delta Queen is well aware the superstructure is wood. They choose to go. Now Government wants to take that choice away. The Queen needs to keep running with passengers. There is a big difference between operating machinery and a static display. Ralph

Submitted by Ralph at: April 2, 2010
Anyone who sails on the Delta Queen is well aware the superstructure is wood. They choose to go. Now Government wants to take that choice away. The Queen needs to keep running with passengers. There is a big difference between operating machinery and a static display. Ralph

Submitted by Captatin Rick at: March 12, 2010
I remember as a young child, my grandparents taking cruise's on the Delta and Mississippi Queen. They had stories and pictures of how beautiful she was. Now I own the Betsy Ann RIverboat in Florida, and wish I had had the opportunity to ride on The Delta Queen. Although I know it will not be the same as a ride, I am looking forward to getting to spend a night on her in the fall, and getting to walk the same staircase my grandparents used to love.

Submitted by Mat at: January 31, 2010
If I had a choice of going to the greatest hotel on earth or the Delta Queen, I'd pick the Delta Queen!

Submitted by Mat at: January 31, 2010
This Hotel was the best hotel/boat i've ever been to. Maura Phillips is very nice and offering. I don't know if she remembers me ,but I was the one that played the calliope in the late summer. I was invited tocome back in the spring but, she hasn't replied back. Still, It was very nice.(you should put some ice for the tea in the main lobby).

Submitted by Longing hopefully at: January 29, 2010
I have never been on the Queen but have followed her history and te history of other steamboats. I am saddened that Inever got the opportunity to board her, I have finally reached a point in my life where I have the time and funds to have been able to bring my whole family to build valuagble memories and teach some history lessons but alas, the Queen is grounded. Wha can we do to bring back the Queen???

Submitted by Delta Queen Lady at: December 28, 2009
Maybe now with Moe's retirement the Trust can get behind the effort for Congress to grant the exemption she needs to travel our inland waterways again. How about it? Will you lobby Congress now?

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